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Andy Dalton

Football Quarterback, Cincinnati Bengals

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 Andy Dalton Biography

Andrew Gregory Dalton was born on October 29, 1987 in Katy, Texas. Andy’s parents, Greg and Tina, met as teenagers in church, stayed together through college at the University of Texas, and had a daughter, Ashley, before Andy came along. The family lived in the Houston suburbs for a few years and decided to permanently relocate to Katy when Andy went into grade school because Tina was already teaching there. Greg is a tax attorney.

Andy got his shock of red hair from his mother’s father, Bill “Red” Payne. He was a very good football player whose career was interrupted by World War II. Andy’s dad quarterbacked Memorial High School to Houston’s city title in 1977. Andy always tried to get his dad’s old number, 14.

Andy played organized baseball, basketball and football in Katy. He was a strong and fluid athlete who was known for keeping his cool in pressure situations. As a boy, Andy followed the Houston Oilers and then as a teenager the Houston Texans. He rooted for Steve McNair before the team moved to Tennessee.

In 2003, Andy enrolled at Katy High School. Though he didn’t see much action as a freshman and sophomore on the gridiron, he gained valuable experience. In his second season, Andy was part of a state championship team, as the Tigers went 15–1 and upset Southlake Carroll 16–15 in the title game at the AlamoDome. He served as a backup to Ben Johnson, who won the game with a 51-yard TD pass.

Andy took over as the starter for coach Mike Johnston the following year and was the highest-rated passer in the district. The star of the team was running back James Aston. His work on the ground enabled Andy to complete 38 of 67 pass attempts for 678 yards, 10 touchdowns and only two interceptions. The Tigers made it to the state quarterfinals and finished the year at 12–2.

Andy’s senior season saw Katy High return to the championship game. He crushed opponents, completing 161 of 254 passes for 2,877 yards with 42 touchdowns. The team was a perfect 14–0 before losing 34–20 in the title game to Southlake Carroll. It was a particularly bitter loss for Andy because he threw three interceptions to end potential scoring drives. Andy finished the game with 232 yards and two touchdowns.

Despite the disappointing ending to the 2005 season, the Houston Chronicle named Andy the Greater Houston Area Offensive Player of the Year. He was also third-team All-State and a finalist for Texas Football 5A Player of the Year. All told, he threw for 15,500 yards and 70 touchdowns during his high school career.

Andy was ranked among the Top 50 NFL-style prep quarterbacks. He decided to stay in-state and accepted a scholarship from Texas Christian University in Fort Worth. Coach Gary Patterson decided to red-shirt Andy in 2006, but kept him with the travel squad as an emergency QB and also to get to know his fellow Horned Frogs. As it turned out, TCU never went more than two quarterbacks deep, so Andy’s line for the year was zeroes straight across.

ON THE RISE

That changed in 2007, when Andy stepped into the starter’s role. He threw for better than 200 yards in his debut, a season-opening shutout of Baylor. Andy went on to have 300-yard games against Air Force and Stanford. Against the Cardinal, TCU came back from 14 points down and tied the game on a fourth-down TD toss from Andy to Aaron Brown.

Andy also had a 298-yard game against San Diego State. He was also the team’s leading rusher in two games. The Horned Frogs went 7–5, and except for a 34–13 loss to Texas, every contest was close. That earned them a trip to the Texas Bowl, where Andy won MVP honors in a 20–13 win over Houston. He finished the season with 2,459 passing yards, 10 TDs and a 59.8% passing mark.

With one successful season under his belt, Andy continued evolving as a field leader. TCU went 10–2 in 2008, with impressive victories over Wyoming, UNLV and Air Force. The two losses were road games against Oklahoma and Utah, both nationally ranked schools. Despite missing two games due to injury, Andy racked up 2,242 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also scored eight Tds on the ground. TCU finished the regular season with a Top 10 ranking and a bid for the Poinsettia Bowl against Boise State. Andy won his second straight bowl MVP award in a 17–16 victory. He threw for 197 yards and ran for 74 more in the game.

Andy’s junior season saw the Horned Frogs run the table in the Mountain West Conference and finish the regular season at 11–0. That was good enough for another Top 10 ranking and a bid to their first major bowl game—the Fiesta Bowl—since 1959. A 17–10 loss to Boise St. was TCU’s lone defeat of the year.

Andy threw for a school-record 2,756 yards and became TCU’s all-time passing leader. His 23 touchdown passes were the second-most in school history. In back-to-back wins over BYU and UNLV, Andy and receiver Antoine Hicks connected for 75-yard scoring plays. Not surprisingly, Andy was mentioned among Heisman Trophy candidates and was a finalist for the Manning Award. He was First-Team All-MWC and received All-America recognition form SI.com and College Football News.

The Horned Frogs were in the running for a national championship all season long in 2010. Andy was magnificent as a senior. TCU did not lose a game, and earned a trip to the Rose Bowl, where it beat fourth-ranked Wisconsin, 21–19. Andy won his third straight bowl MVP award.

TCU ended the year with a #2 national ranking, behind Auburn. It was the school’s first unbeaten, untied season since Sammy Baugh was the quarterback in 1938. TCU was actually ranked #1 in the BCS for a week in October. Andy led the team to impressive victories over Oregon State and Utah. The Utes were ranked #6 when they met, and TCU destroyed them on Utah’s home turf, 47–7. Andy passed for a career-best 355 yards in the game. He set school records with 27 touchdown passes and a 66.1 completion percentage on the year, and broke virtually every career passing mark.

Andy was tabbed as a late first-round or early second-round pick in the 2011 NFL draft. The Bengals selected him in the second round with the 35th overall pick. The plan was for Andy to take over for veteran Carson Palmer as soon as he was ready. It became obvious early in training camp that he would be ready sooner rather than later, and not surprisingly Palmer asked for a trade. New offensive coordinator Jay Gruden installed a West Coast offense to take advantage of Andy’s mobility and accuracy and he won the starting job.

Andy’s first pro game came on the road against the Cleveland Browns. He completed 10 of 15 passes before leaving the game with an injury. The Bengals went on to win 27–17. The following week, Cincinnati fell behind the Broncos in Denver, but Andy rallied the team to a dramatic second-half comeback. Although the Bengals lost 24–22, Andy’s teammates and coaches knew he was something special. In the final two quarters of that game, with the Denver pass rush swarming around him, he threw for nearly 300 yards. He was pinpoint-perfect in bating the Indianapolis Colts a week later.

October was even better. Andy was named Offensive Rookie of the Month as he led the team to a 4–0 record and threw for more than 900 yards. Two of those wins were of the comeback variety, including a victory over the Browns on a 51-yard pass to A.J. Green with just over a minute left. Green, the team’s #1 pick in 2011, was totally in sync with Andy at this point. They would go on to set an NFL record for passing/receiving yards between a rookie quarterback and rookie receiver. This was all the more impressive considering they were not allowed to work out together until late July because of the NFL lockout.

Andy and the Bengals ran into an inevitable speed bump in the second half. Beginning in mid-November, they dropped four of five games—though only one was a blowout. They finished strong with wins over the St. Louis Rams and Arizona Cardinals and a narrow loss to the Baltimore Ravens to finish the year 9–7. That was good enough to snag a Wild Card slot. One year earlier, Cincinnati had finished dead last in the AFC North.

Andy’s final regular season numbers were superb. He completed 300 of 518 pass attempts for 3,398 yards and 20 touchdowns against only 13 interceptions. To that point in NFL history, only four rookies had ever passed for 3,000 yards and 20 touchdowns. The others were Peyton Manning, Charley Conerly, Dan Marino and Cam Newton.

The Bengals faced the Houston Texans in the opening round in the playoffs. Houston had suffered a series of injuries to their quarterbacks, forcing rookie T.J. Yates into a starting role. When the two teams took the field, it marked the first time in NFL history two rookies started against each other in a postseason game. The vaunted Houston defense lived up to its reputation. Although Andy had good success passing, the Texans forced interceptions at crucial moments to win 31–10.

The Bengals’ surprising showing earned them a tougher schedule in 2012, but that did not diminish the high expectations for Andy and the team in his second NFL season. Cincinnati got off to a rocky 3–5 start, but righted the ship with a 31-13 drubbing of the defending champion New York Giants. In that game, Andy outdueled Eli Manning, tossing four touchdown passes. The Bengals lost just one more game that season, and finished the year with a 23–17 victory over the Ravens. That gave Cincinnati a 10–6 record—the same as Baltimore. Unfortunately, they fell short in the tiebreaker and had to settle for second place again. Their 10 wins, however, were enough for a return trip to the playoffs.

Statistically, as well as in the win column, Andy had a very good second season. Even in defeat he excelled. In a narrow loss to the Browns, he threw for 381 yards. In hyped-up games, like the one against Carson Palmer and the Raiders, he was utterly unfazed. He threw three TD passes against Oakland as the Bengals cruised to a 34–10 win. Those scoring passes put him over 20 for the season. Only Dan Marino and Peyton Manning had back-to-back 20-TD seasons to start their careers. Andy also used his legs when an open receiver was unavailable. He ran for go-ahead touchdowns against the San Diego Chargers and Philadelphia Eagles.

Perhaps the sweetest victory of the year came two days before Christmas when Andy beat the division-rival Pittsburgh Steelers for the first time in four tries. A clutch pass to Green set up the winning field goal with just a few seconds left. All told, Andy threw for 3,669 yards and 27 touchdowns and ran for four more.

Andy’s second postseason ended just as his first had, with a loss to the Texans. Once again, Houston prevailed in a tight defensive battle, 19–13. For some quarterbacks, having their season end so close to home twice in a row would send them reeling. However, as the 2013 campaign got under way, Andy took another step forward. In the season opener, he completed 26 of 33 passes in a narrow loss to the Chicago Bears, but then led the Bengals to victories over the Steelers and Green Bay Packers.

Cincinnati kept rolling behind Andy’s strong right arm. He threw for three touchdowns in an overtime victory over the Buffalo Bills. One week later he engineered another close win over the Detroit Lions, throwing for 372 yards and three touchdowns. Andy made it 11 touchdowns in three weeks when he threw for five in a 49–9 wipeout of the New York Jets. That earned him Offensive Player of the Month honors for October. Heading into November, the Bengals were 6–3 and sitting atop the AFC North.

Those who doubted Andy when he came into the league know better now. The consensus is that he has learned from his playoff defeats, and that his confidence is through the roof after a fast start in 2013.

ANDY THE PLAYER

Andy was hardly a raw rookie when he was inserted as starter in 2011. He had played a lot of football and had a well-rounded skill set. His arm strength and accuracy helped him in his first season when the reads weren’t always there. By his second season, the Bengals were letting him change plays at the line of scrimmage.

Andy is comfortable throwing from the pocket, but the team’s offense takes advantage of his mobility. He is not afraid to take the rushing yards if they are there for him. Heading into his third NFL campaign, Andy could stand to improve his footwork in the pocket and the timing of his long passes. Fixing one issue may very well fix the other.

As a leader, Andy’s early success has helped him immensely. He has never been a loud rah-rah guy, but he isn’t afraid to speak up if sees an issue, and the Bengals trust and respect him enough to listen.

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FAQs
  • HOW TO BOOK Andy Dalton?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like Andy Dalton for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for Andy Dalton, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for Andy Dalton or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO BOOK Andy Dalton?

    Booking fees for Andy Dalton, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Andy Dalton, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • WHO IS THE AGENT FOR Andy Dalton?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Andy Dalton for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Andy Dalton for your next private or corporate function.
  • WHAT IS A FULL-SERVICE TALENT BOOKING AGENCY?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Andy Dalton or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Andy Dalton or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.
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This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

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Andy Dalton

Football Quarterback, Cincinnati Bengals

Speaking Fee:
Categories:

Andy Dalton Biography

Andrew Gregory Dalton was born on October 29, 1987 in Katy, Texas. Andy’s parents, Greg and Tina, met as teenagers in church, stayed together through college at the University of Texas, and had a daughter, Ashley, before Andy came along. The family lived in the Houston suburbs for a few years and decided to permanently relocate to Katy when Andy went into grade school because Tina was already teaching there. Greg is a tax attorney.

Andy got his shock of red hair from his mother’s father, Bill “Red” Payne. He was a very good football player whose career was interrupted by World War II. Andy’s dad quarterbacked Memorial High School to Houston’s city title in 1977. Andy always tried to get his dad’s old number, 14.

Andy played organized baseball, basketball and football in Katy. He was a strong and fluid athlete who was known for keeping his cool in pressure situations. As a boy, Andy followed the Houston Oilers and then as a teenager the Houston Texans. He rooted for Steve McNair before the team moved to Tennessee.

In 2003, Andy enrolled at Katy High School. Though he didn’t see much action as a freshman and sophomore on the gridiron, he gained valuable experience. In his second season, Andy was part of a state championship team, as the Tigers went 15–1 and upset Southlake Carroll 16–15 in the title game at the AlamoDome. He served as a backup to Ben Johnson, who won the game with a 51-yard TD pass.

Andy took over as the starter for coach Mike Johnston the following year and was the highest-rated passer in the district. The star of the team was running back James Aston. His work on the ground enabled Andy to complete 38 of 67 pass attempts for 678 yards, 10 touchdowns and only two interceptions. The Tigers made it to the state quarterfinals and finished the year at 12–2.

Andy’s senior season saw Katy High return to the championship game. He crushed opponents, completing 161 of 254 passes for 2,877 yards with 42 touchdowns. The team was a perfect 14–0 before losing 34–20 in the title game to Southlake Carroll. It was a particularly bitter loss for Andy because he threw three interceptions to end potential scoring drives. Andy finished the game with 232 yards and two touchdowns.

Despite the disappointing ending to the 2005 season, the Houston Chronicle named Andy the Greater Houston Area Offensive Player of the Year. He was also third-team All-State and a finalist for Texas Football 5A Player of the Year. All told, he threw for 15,500 yards and 70 touchdowns during his high school career.

Andy was ranked among the Top 50 NFL-style prep quarterbacks. He decided to stay in-state and accepted a scholarship from Texas Christian University in Fort Worth. Coach Gary Patterson decided to red-shirt Andy in 2006, but kept him with the travel squad as an emergency QB and also to get to know his fellow Horned Frogs. As it turned out, TCU never went more than two quarterbacks deep, so Andy’s line for the year was zeroes straight across.

ON THE RISE

That changed in 2007, when Andy stepped into the starter’s role. He threw for better than 200 yards in his debut, a season-opening shutout of Baylor. Andy went on to have 300-yard games against Air Force and Stanford. Against the Cardinal, TCU came back from 14 points down and tied the game on a fourth-down TD toss from Andy to Aaron Brown.

Andy also had a 298-yard game against San Diego State. He was also the team’s leading rusher in two games. The Horned Frogs went 7–5, and except for a 34–13 loss to Texas, every contest was close. That earned them a trip to the Texas Bowl, where Andy won MVP honors in a 20–13 win over Houston. He finished the season with 2,459 passing yards, 10 TDs and a 59.8% passing mark.

With one successful season under his belt, Andy continued evolving as a field leader. TCU went 10–2 in 2008, with impressive victories over Wyoming, UNLV and Air Force. The two losses were road games against Oklahoma and Utah, both nationally ranked schools. Despite missing two games due to injury, Andy racked up 2,242 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also scored eight Tds on the ground. TCU finished the regular season with a Top 10 ranking and a bid for the Poinsettia Bowl against Boise State. Andy won his second straight bowl MVP award in a 17–16 victory. He threw for 197 yards and ran for 74 more in the game.

Andy’s junior season saw the Horned Frogs run the table in the Mountain West Conference and finish the regular season at 11–0. That was good enough for another Top 10 ranking and a bid to their first major bowl game—the Fiesta Bowl—since 1959. A 17–10 loss to Boise St. was TCU’s lone defeat of the year.

Andy threw for a school-record 2,756 yards and became TCU’s all-time passing leader. His 23 touchdown passes were the second-most in school history. In back-to-back wins over BYU and UNLV, Andy and receiver Antoine Hicks connected for 75-yard scoring plays. Not surprisingly, Andy was mentioned among Heisman Trophy candidates and was a finalist for the Manning Award. He was First-Team All-MWC and received All-America recognition form SI.com and College Football News.

The Horned Frogs were in the running for a national championship all season long in 2010. Andy was magnificent as a senior. TCU did not lose a game, and earned a trip to the Rose Bowl, where it beat fourth-ranked Wisconsin, 21–19. Andy won his third straight bowl MVP award.

TCU ended the year with a #2 national ranking, behind Auburn. It was the school’s first unbeaten, untied season since Sammy Baugh was the quarterback in 1938. TCU was actually ranked #1 in the BCS for a week in October. Andy led the team to impressive victories over Oregon State and Utah. The Utes were ranked #6 when they met, and TCU destroyed them on Utah’s home turf, 47–7. Andy passed for a career-best 355 yards in the game. He set school records with 27 touchdown passes and a 66.1 completion percentage on the year, and broke virtually every career passing mark.

Andy was tabbed as a late first-round or early second-round pick in the 2011 NFL draft. The Bengals selected him in the second round with the 35th overall pick. The plan was for Andy to take over for veteran Carson Palmer as soon as he was ready. It became obvious early in training camp that he would be ready sooner rather than later, and not surprisingly Palmer asked for a trade. New offensive coordinator Jay Gruden installed a West Coast offense to take advantage of Andy’s mobility and accuracy and he won the starting job.

Andy’s first pro game came on the road against the Cleveland Browns. He completed 10 of 15 passes before leaving the game with an injury. The Bengals went on to win 27–17. The following week, Cincinnati fell behind the Broncos in Denver, but Andy rallied the team to a dramatic second-half comeback. Although the Bengals lost 24–22, Andy’s teammates and coaches knew he was something special. In the final two quarters of that game, with the Denver pass rush swarming around him, he threw for nearly 300 yards. He was pinpoint-perfect in bating the Indianapolis Colts a week later.

October was even better. Andy was named Offensive Rookie of the Month as he led the team to a 4–0 record and threw for more than 900 yards. Two of those wins were of the comeback variety, including a victory over the Browns on a 51-yard pass to A.J. Green with just over a minute left. Green, the team’s #1 pick in 2011, was totally in sync with Andy at this point. They would go on to set an NFL record for passing/receiving yards between a rookie quarterback and rookie receiver. This was all the more impressive considering they were not allowed to work out together until late July because of the NFL lockout.

Andy and the Bengals ran into an inevitable speed bump in the second half. Beginning in mid-November, they dropped four of five games—though only one was a blowout. They finished strong with wins over the St. Louis Rams and Arizona Cardinals and a narrow loss to the Baltimore Ravens to finish the year 9–7. That was good enough to snag a Wild Card slot. One year earlier, Cincinnati had finished dead last in the AFC North.

Andy’s final regular season numbers were superb. He completed 300 of 518 pass attempts for 3,398 yards and 20 touchdowns against only 13 interceptions. To that point in NFL history, only four rookies had ever passed for 3,000 yards and 20 touchdowns. The others were Peyton Manning, Charley Conerly, Dan Marino and Cam Newton.

The Bengals faced the Houston Texans in the opening round in the playoffs. Houston had suffered a series of injuries to their quarterbacks, forcing rookie T.J. Yates into a starting role. When the two teams took the field, it marked the first time in NFL history two rookies started against each other in a postseason game. The vaunted Houston defense lived up to its reputation. Although Andy had good success passing, the Texans forced interceptions at crucial moments to win 31–10.

The Bengals’ surprising showing earned them a tougher schedule in 2012, but that did not diminish the high expectations for Andy and the team in his second NFL season. Cincinnati got off to a rocky 3–5 start, but righted the ship with a 31-13 drubbing of the defending champion New York Giants. In that game, Andy outdueled Eli Manning, tossing four touchdown passes. The Bengals lost just one more game that season, and finished the year with a 23–17 victory over the Ravens. That gave Cincinnati a 10–6 record—the same as Baltimore. Unfortunately, they fell short in the tiebreaker and had to settle for second place again. Their 10 wins, however, were enough for a return trip to the playoffs.

Statistically, as well as in the win column, Andy had a very good second season. Even in defeat he excelled. In a narrow loss to the Browns, he threw for 381 yards. In hyped-up games, like the one against Carson Palmer and the Raiders, he was utterly unfazed. He threw three TD passes against Oakland as the Bengals cruised to a 34–10 win. Those scoring passes put him over 20 for the season. Only Dan Marino and Peyton Manning had back-to-back 20-TD seasons to start their careers. Andy also used his legs when an open receiver was unavailable. He ran for go-ahead touchdowns against the San Diego Chargers and Philadelphia Eagles.

Perhaps the sweetest victory of the year came two days before Christmas when Andy beat the division-rival Pittsburgh Steelers for the first time in four tries. A clutch pass to Green set up the winning field goal with just a few seconds left. All told, Andy threw for 3,669 yards and 27 touchdowns and ran for four more.

Andy’s second postseason ended just as his first had, with a loss to the Texans. Once again, Houston prevailed in a tight defensive battle, 19–13. For some quarterbacks, having their season end so close to home twice in a row would send them reeling. However, as the 2013 campaign got under way, Andy took another step forward. In the season opener, he completed 26 of 33 passes in a narrow loss to the Chicago Bears, but then led the Bengals to victories over the Steelers and Green Bay Packers.

Cincinnati kept rolling behind Andy’s strong right arm. He threw for three touchdowns in an overtime victory over the Buffalo Bills. One week later he engineered another close win over the Detroit Lions, throwing for 372 yards and three touchdowns. Andy made it 11 touchdowns in three weeks when he threw for five in a 49–9 wipeout of the New York Jets. That earned him Offensive Player of the Month honors for October. Heading into November, the Bengals were 6–3 and sitting atop the AFC North.

Those who doubted Andy when he came into the league know better now. The consensus is that he has learned from his playoff defeats, and that his confidence is through the roof after a fast start in 2013.

ANDY THE PLAYER

Andy was hardly a raw rookie when he was inserted as starter in 2011. He had played a lot of football and had a well-rounded skill set. His arm strength and accuracy helped him in his first season when the reads weren’t always there. By his second season, the Bengals were letting him change plays at the line of scrimmage.

Andy is comfortable throwing from the pocket, but the team’s offense takes advantage of his mobility. He is not afraid to take the rushing yards if they are there for him. Heading into his third NFL campaign, Andy could stand to improve his footwork in the pocket and the timing of his long passes. Fixing one issue may very well fix the other.

As a leader, Andy’s early success has helped him immensely. He has never been a loud rah-rah guy, but he isn’t afraid to speak up if sees an issue, and the Bengals trust and respect him enough to listen.

FAQs on booking Andy Dalton

  • How to book Andy Dalton?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like Andy Dalton for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for Andy Dalton, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for Andy Dalton or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • How much does it cost to book Andy Dalton?

    Booking fees for Andy Dalton, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Andy Dalton, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • Who is the agent for Andy Dalton?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Andy Dalton for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Andy Dalton for your next private or corporate function.
  • What is a full-service talent booking agency?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Andy Dalton or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Andy Dalton or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.

Andy Dalton is a keynote speaker and industry expert who speaks on a wide range of topics . The estimated speaking fee range to book Andy Dalton for your event is available upon request. Andy Dalton generally travels from and can be booked for (private) corporate events, personal appearances, keynote speeches, or other performances. Similar motivational celebrity speakers are Philip Rivers, Joe Flacco, Matthew Stafford, Tony Romo and Ben Roethlisberger. Contact All American Speakers for ratings, reviews, videos and information on scheduling Andy Dalton for an upcoming event.

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Speakers Similar to Andy Dalton

This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

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