Click to Open Search Bar

J.D. Kleinke

Medical Economist & Author

REQUEST BOOKING INFORMATION

 J.D. Kleinke Biography

J.D. Kleinke is a Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a pioneering healthcare information entrepreneur, medical economist, author, and business strategist.

Kleinke has been instrumental in creating four healthcare information organizations and served on numerous healthcare company boards; helped hospitals, health systems, and physician groups nationwide prepare for Medicare modernization and health reform; and provided business, product, and technology strategy services to both start-ups and established healthcare companies.

Kleinke has served as a healthcare business columnist for The Wall Street Journal; advised both sides of the political aisle on pragmatic approaches to health policy and legislation; and long been a leading advocate for a smarter, data-driven, post-partisan healthcare.

Kleinke's work has also appeared in Health Affairs, JAMA, Barron's, The Wall Street Journal, The British Medical Journal, Modern Healthcare, and numerous other publications. His books Bleeding Edge: The Business of Healthcare in the New Century and Oxymorons: The Myth of a US Healthcare System are required reading in many physician-executive MBA programs and health administration graduate programs in the US. His third book, Catching Babies, a novel about the training and culture of obstetrician/gynecologists, was published in 2011.

For audiences across the healthcare, medical, corporate, policy, and patient communities, J.D. Kleinke provides a no-nonsense, practical, and often humorous look at the collision of government reform, increasing patient economic empowerment, and emerging information and medical technologies—and their combined effects on the future challenges and opportunities for today's healthcare organization.

-
Videos
Books
Catching Babies

Catching Babies

Oxymorons: The Myth of a U.S. Health Care System

Oxymorons: The Myth of a U.S. Health Care System

Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the New Century

Bleeding Edge: The Business of Health Care in the New Century

Speaking Topics
  • Countdown to Meltdown? Preparing Your Organization for Obamacare, Market Reform & the Brave New Healthcare World

    What does the actual health reform plan look like, what happens when 30 million new people enter the "system" as we know it, and what will it all mean for your organization? "Obamacare" has survived the Supreme Court but the health reform law itself may be overshadowed by larger shifts in market power—and continuing government budget crises, as lawmakers target Medicare and Medicaid as sources of major savings. This session provides a critical overview of where healthcare stands today; the latest on spending trends and market dynamics; and how the health reform plan will play out for all major stakeholders, including providers, payers, employers, patients, and consumers. This session also examines the concurrent effects of the reform plan, health insurance market upheavals, increasing patient economic empowerment, and emerging information technologies on today's healthcare organization. Finally, it lays out a practical framework and set of critical success factors for your organization going forward, as healthcare faces the greatest challenges and changes of our lifetime.

  • Risky Hospital Business 2: Remake of the 1990s Managed Care Classic

    Buried not so deep in President Obama's health reform plan are radical changes in provider payment methodologies. Accountable care organizations, medical homes, electronic medical record-related subsidies, and penalties—these are only a few of the latest attempts to correct the health system's economic, behavioral, and organizational disorders. The cost and quality problems that gave rise to the national managed care companies in the 1990s have not gone away, inspiring both the government and large health plans to simultaneously revisit many of those same managed care strategies. Will this second round—and double dose—of harsh economic medicine prove worse than the disease? Or are certain aspects of healthcare's cost and quality problems simply incurable? How can provider organizations cope with a system that, as the government and payers attempt to re-engineer it around reimbursement, seems to yield only more chaos? This session will outline how your organization can navigate the latest attempt to use reimbursement and other payment reforms to re-engineer the US healthcare system.

  • American Medicine 2.0: The Revolution Will Be Computerized

    Health reform is upon us, much of it finally ready for the computer age, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. And many of the core provisions of the new health reform plan are already finding their way into the business strategies of the larger health plans and more aggressive provider systems. These include the bundling of provider payments—with bonuses for good outcomes and penalties for bad ones—to hospitals and physicians for both high-dollar acute cases; transfer of financial risk from insurers and the government to "accountable care organizations" for the aggregate cost of chronically ill patients, also with bonuses and penalties driven by reported outcomes; and rapid adaption of current clinical information systems and/or the re-engineering of antiquated clinical workflows. All of these new initiatives are highly dependent on major expansions in the availability of patient clinical data—including all lab and imaging data and related studies—along with the creation of new information flows within and across provider systems. The aggregate effect of these ultimately interrelated initiatives will translate into new opportunities for clinical integration. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the pitfalls and seize the opportunities associated with this long overdue computerization of American medicine.

  • The Patient Is In: Healthcare’s Next Economic Revolution

    Over the past two decades, the locus of medical decision making—via the rise and fall of "managed care"—has shifted from physician to health plan to patient. Tiered co-payments and the introduction of high-deductible health insurance, coupled with health savings accounts, are ushering in the inevitable decline of first-dollar coverage by health plans and the often irrational demand-inducement behavior of consumers. How will people behave when they are confronted daily with a financial document that looks like a 401(k) plan statement—one which shrinks with every doctor visit, lab test, new prescription, and refill? Everything we think we know about how consumers will behave when purchasing routine care from these new cash accounts—and about how desperately ill patients will behave when draining those same accounts to fight a life-threatening illness—is completely speculative. This session examines key moments in healthcare history and policy for clues as to what the future will hold for all of us, not just as patients, but as real healthcare consumers.

  • eHealth 2.0: The Once & Future Healthcare Information Revolution

    A new generation of health information technology is emerging and this one may finally be ready for primetime, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. Beyond the government's sudden willingness to finance the computerization of healthcare, there has been explosive growth in e-prescribing and other electronic medical tools, as a new generation of providers goes online and as patient communities also emerge online, allowing patients to share exquisite details about their medical conditions and experiences. To attract and retain the most lucrative (i.e., well-off, well-insured, and web-enabled) segments of the market, providers and payers are promoting the use of provider/patient e-visits and remote systems to manage disease, track changes in symptoms, and share data. New reimbursement methods and models—including insurer-paid e-visits and annual "connectivity" fees from patients—are emerging in conjunction with these technologies, as the health IT community finally addresses the need for privacy, security, physician income preservation, and liability protection. The sum total of these trends is the long overdue computerization of healthcare and the "liquification" of patient data from paper charts and institutional silos. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the technical pitfalls and seize the market opportunities associated with this long overdue connection between providers and patients.

FAQs
  • HOW TO BOOK J.D. Kleinke?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like J.D. Kleinke for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for J.D. Kleinke, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for J.D. Kleinke or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO BOOK J.D. Kleinke?

    Booking fees for J.D. Kleinke, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire J.D. Kleinke, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • WHO IS THE AGENT FOR J.D. Kleinke?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like J.D. Kleinke for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book J.D. Kleinke for your next private or corporate function.
  • WHAT IS A FULL-SERVICE TALENT BOOKING AGENCY?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent J.D. Kleinke or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for J.D. Kleinke or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.
Check Availability

Tell us about your event!

During normal business hours, we respond to most inquiries within 4 hours.

Users also viewed these speakers:

This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

J.D. Kleinke

Medical Economist & Author

Travels From:
Washington, DC, USA
Speaking Fee:

J.D. Kleinke Biography

J.D. Kleinke is a Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a pioneering healthcare information entrepreneur, medical economist, author, and business strategist.

Kleinke has been instrumental in creating four healthcare information organizations and served on numerous healthcare company boards; helped hospitals, health systems, and physician groups nationwide prepare for Medicare modernization and health reform; and provided business, product, and technology strategy services to both start-ups and established healthcare companies.

Kleinke has served as a healthcare business columnist for The Wall Street Journal; advised both sides of the political aisle on pragmatic approaches to health policy and legislation; and long been a leading advocate for a smarter, data-driven, post-partisan healthcare.

Kleinke's work has also appeared in Health Affairs, JAMA, Barron's, The Wall Street Journal, The British Medical Journal, Modern Healthcare, and numerous other publications. His books Bleeding Edge: The Business of Healthcare in the New Century and Oxymorons: The Myth of a US Healthcare System are required reading in many physician-executive MBA programs and health administration graduate programs in the US. His third book, Catching Babies, a novel about the training and culture of obstetrician/gynecologists, was published in 2011.

For audiences across the healthcare, medical, corporate, policy, and patient communities, J.D. Kleinke provides a no-nonsense, practical, and often humorous look at the collision of government reform, increasing patient economic empowerment, and emerging information and medical technologies—and their combined effects on the future challenges and opportunities for today's healthcare organization.

J.D. Kleinke Videos

  • JD Kleinke NBC News
  • JD Kleinke - Health Care Information Entrepreneur and Speaker

J.D. Kleinke Books

J.D. Kleinke Speaking Topics

  • Countdown to Meltdown? Preparing Your Organization for Obamacare, Market Reform & the Brave New Healthcare World

    What does the actual health reform plan look like, what happens when 30 million new people enter the "system" as we know it, and what will it all mean for your organization? "Obamacare" has survived the Supreme Court but the health reform law itself may be overshadowed by larger shifts in market power—and continuing government budget crises, as lawmakers target Medicare and Medicaid as sources of major savings. This session provides a critical overview of where healthcare stands today; the latest on spending trends and market dynamics; and how the health reform plan will play out for all major stakeholders, including providers, payers, employers, patients, and consumers. This session also examines the concurrent effects of the reform plan, health insurance market upheavals, increasing patient economic empowerment, and emerging information technologies on today's healthcare organization. Finally, it lays out a practical framework and set of critical success factors for your organization going forward, as healthcare faces the greatest challenges and changes of our lifetime.

  • Risky Hospital Business 2: Remake of the 1990s Managed Care Classic

    Buried not so deep in President Obama's health reform plan are radical changes in provider payment methodologies. Accountable care organizations, medical homes, electronic medical record-related subsidies, and penalties—these are only a few of the latest attempts to correct the health system's economic, behavioral, and organizational disorders. The cost and quality problems that gave rise to the national managed care companies in the 1990s have not gone away, inspiring both the government and large health plans to simultaneously revisit many of those same managed care strategies. Will this second round—and double dose—of harsh economic medicine prove worse than the disease? Or are certain aspects of healthcare's cost and quality problems simply incurable? How can provider organizations cope with a system that, as the government and payers attempt to re-engineer it around reimbursement, seems to yield only more chaos? This session will outline how your organization can navigate the latest attempt to use reimbursement and other payment reforms to re-engineer the US healthcare system.

  • American Medicine 2.0: The Revolution Will Be Computerized

    Health reform is upon us, much of it finally ready for the computer age, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. And many of the core provisions of the new health reform plan are already finding their way into the business strategies of the larger health plans and more aggressive provider systems. These include the bundling of provider payments—with bonuses for good outcomes and penalties for bad ones—to hospitals and physicians for both high-dollar acute cases; transfer of financial risk from insurers and the government to "accountable care organizations" for the aggregate cost of chronically ill patients, also with bonuses and penalties driven by reported outcomes; and rapid adaption of current clinical information systems and/or the re-engineering of antiquated clinical workflows. All of these new initiatives are highly dependent on major expansions in the availability of patient clinical data—including all lab and imaging data and related studies—along with the creation of new information flows within and across provider systems. The aggregate effect of these ultimately interrelated initiatives will translate into new opportunities for clinical integration. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the pitfalls and seize the opportunities associated with this long overdue computerization of American medicine.

  • The Patient Is In: Healthcare’s Next Economic Revolution

    Over the past two decades, the locus of medical decision making—via the rise and fall of "managed care"—has shifted from physician to health plan to patient. Tiered co-payments and the introduction of high-deductible health insurance, coupled with health savings accounts, are ushering in the inevitable decline of first-dollar coverage by health plans and the often irrational demand-inducement behavior of consumers. How will people behave when they are confronted daily with a financial document that looks like a 401(k) plan statement—one which shrinks with every doctor visit, lab test, new prescription, and refill? Everything we think we know about how consumers will behave when purchasing routine care from these new cash accounts—and about how desperately ill patients will behave when draining those same accounts to fight a life-threatening illness—is completely speculative. This session examines key moments in healthcare history and policy for clues as to what the future will hold for all of us, not just as patients, but as real healthcare consumers.

  • eHealth 2.0: The Once & Future Healthcare Information Revolution

    A new generation of health information technology is emerging and this one may finally be ready for primetime, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. Beyond the government's sudden willingness to finance the computerization of healthcare, there has been explosive growth in e-prescribing and other electronic medical tools, as a new generation of providers goes online and as patient communities also emerge online, allowing patients to share exquisite details about their medical conditions and experiences. To attract and retain the most lucrative (i.e., well-off, well-insured, and web-enabled) segments of the market, providers and payers are promoting the use of provider/patient e-visits and remote systems to manage disease, track changes in symptoms, and share data. New reimbursement methods and models—including insurer-paid e-visits and annual "connectivity" fees from patients—are emerging in conjunction with these technologies, as the health IT community finally addresses the need for privacy, security, physician income preservation, and liability protection. The sum total of these trends is the long overdue computerization of healthcare and the "liquification" of patient data from paper charts and institutional silos. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the technical pitfalls and seize the market opportunities associated with this long overdue connection between providers and patients.

FAQs on booking J.D. Kleinke

  • How to book J.D. Kleinke?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like J.D. Kleinke for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for J.D. Kleinke, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for J.D. Kleinke or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • How much does it cost to book J.D. Kleinke?

    Booking fees for J.D. Kleinke, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire J.D. Kleinke, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • Who is the agent for J.D. Kleinke?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like J.D. Kleinke for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book J.D. Kleinke for your next private or corporate function.
  • What is a full-service talent booking agency?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent J.D. Kleinke or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for J.D. Kleinke or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.

J.D. Kleinke is a keynote speaker and industry expert who speaks on a wide range of topics . The estimated speaking fee range to book J.D. Kleinke for your event is $10,000 - $20,000. J.D. Kleinke generally travels from Washington, DC, USA and can be booked for (private) corporate events, personal appearances, keynote speeches, or other performances. Similar motivational celebrity speakers are Joe Flower, Susan Dentzer, Dr. Jeffrey Bauer, Ian Morrison and Peter Salgo. Contact All American Speakers for ratings, reviews, videos and information on scheduling J.D. Kleinke for an upcoming event.

J.D. Kleinke Speaker Videos

  • JD Kleinke NBC News
    JD Kleinke - Health Care Information Entrepreneur and Speaker

J.D. Kleinke Speaking Topics

  • Countdown to Meltdown? Preparing Your Organization for Obamacare, Market Reform & the Brave New Healthcare World

    What does the actual health reform plan look like, what happens when 30 million new people enter the "system" as we know it, and what will it all mean for your organization? "Obamacare" has survived the Supreme Court but the health reform law itself may be overshadowed by larger shifts in market power—and continuing government budget crises, as lawmakers target Medicare and Medicaid as sources of major savings. This session provides a critical overview of where healthcare stands today; the latest on spending trends and market dynamics; and how the health reform plan will play out for all major stakeholders, including providers, payers, employers, patients, and consumers. This session also examines the concurrent effects of the reform plan, health insurance market upheavals, increasing patient economic empowerment, and emerging information technologies on today's healthcare organization. Finally, it lays out a practical framework and set of critical success factors for your organization going forward, as healthcare faces the greatest challenges and changes of our lifetime.

  • Risky Hospital Business 2: Remake of the 1990s Managed Care Classic

    Buried not so deep in President Obama's health reform plan are radical changes in provider payment methodologies. Accountable care organizations, medical homes, electronic medical record-related subsidies, and penalties—these are only a few of the latest attempts to correct the health system's economic, behavioral, and organizational disorders. The cost and quality problems that gave rise to the national managed care companies in the 1990s have not gone away, inspiring both the government and large health plans to simultaneously revisit many of those same managed care strategies. Will this second round—and double dose—of harsh economic medicine prove worse than the disease? Or are certain aspects of healthcare's cost and quality problems simply incurable? How can provider organizations cope with a system that, as the government and payers attempt to re-engineer it around reimbursement, seems to yield only more chaos? This session will outline how your organization can navigate the latest attempt to use reimbursement and other payment reforms to re-engineer the US healthcare system.

  • American Medicine 2.0: The Revolution Will Be Computerized

    Health reform is upon us, much of it finally ready for the computer age, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. And many of the core provisions of the new health reform plan are already finding their way into the business strategies of the larger health plans and more aggressive provider systems. These include the bundling of provider payments—with bonuses for good outcomes and penalties for bad ones—to hospitals and physicians for both high-dollar acute cases; transfer of financial risk from insurers and the government to "accountable care organizations" for the aggregate cost of chronically ill patients, also with bonuses and penalties driven by reported outcomes; and rapid adaption of current clinical information systems and/or the re-engineering of antiquated clinical workflows. All of these new initiatives are highly dependent on major expansions in the availability of patient clinical data—including all lab and imaging data and related studies—along with the creation of new information flows within and across provider systems. The aggregate effect of these ultimately interrelated initiatives will translate into new opportunities for clinical integration. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the pitfalls and seize the opportunities associated with this long overdue computerization of American medicine.

  • The Patient Is In: Healthcare’s Next Economic Revolution

    Over the past two decades, the locus of medical decision making—via the rise and fall of "managed care"—has shifted from physician to health plan to patient. Tiered co-payments and the introduction of high-deductible health insurance, coupled with health savings accounts, are ushering in the inevitable decline of first-dollar coverage by health plans and the often irrational demand-inducement behavior of consumers. How will people behave when they are confronted daily with a financial document that looks like a 401(k) plan statement—one which shrinks with every doctor visit, lab test, new prescription, and refill? Everything we think we know about how consumers will behave when purchasing routine care from these new cash accounts—and about how desperately ill patients will behave when draining those same accounts to fight a life-threatening illness—is completely speculative. This session examines key moments in healthcare history and policy for clues as to what the future will hold for all of us, not just as patients, but as real healthcare consumers.

  • eHealth 2.0: The Once & Future Healthcare Information Revolution

    A new generation of health information technology is emerging and this one may finally be ready for primetime, thanks to $17.2 billion in federal funding. Beyond the government's sudden willingness to finance the computerization of healthcare, there has been explosive growth in e-prescribing and other electronic medical tools, as a new generation of providers goes online and as patient communities also emerge online, allowing patients to share exquisite details about their medical conditions and experiences. To attract and retain the most lucrative (i.e., well-off, well-insured, and web-enabled) segments of the market, providers and payers are promoting the use of provider/patient e-visits and remote systems to manage disease, track changes in symptoms, and share data. New reimbursement methods and models—including insurer-paid e-visits and annual "connectivity" fees from patients—are emerging in conjunction with these technologies, as the health IT community finally addresses the need for privacy, security, physician income preservation, and liability protection. The sum total of these trends is the long overdue computerization of healthcare and the "liquification" of patient data from paper charts and institutional silos. This session will outline how your organization can avoid the technical pitfalls and seize the market opportunities associated with this long overdue connection between providers and patients.

Tell us about your event!

During normal business hours, we respond to most inquiries within 4 hours.

  • Customized Service

    Our agents find the right fit for your event

  • Unparalleled Database

    Full access to all speakers & celebrities

  • One Stop Shopping

    A reliable and unbiased point of contact

  • Logistics Management

    Your personal Logistics Manager who takes care of all event details

Speakers Similar to J.D. Kleinke

This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

TOP