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Andy Enfield

Head Basketball Coach of the USC Trojans

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 Andy Enfield Biography

Andy Enfield, 51, a proven winner as a player, assistant coach and head coach, was named the USC men’s basketball head coach on April 1, 2013 and has quickly brought success to the Trojans’ basketball program. Results came immediately with the Trojans setting the school single-season win record and the most wins in program history over a two-year, three-year, four-year and five-year period. USC has won 109 games over the last five seasons which is the third-most wins in the Pac-12 and the 21st-most wins in the nation among power conferences during that time. USC has had the second-best overall record in the Pac-12 two of the last three seasons (24-12 in 2018 & 22-9 in 2020).

Enfield guided the Trojans into the postseason in three consecutive seasons (2016-18), the first time for USC since 2007-09, all while his athletes have set the program’s top team GPAs for the Spring, Fall and Summer sessions. Enfield has brought in seven consecutive Top 30 recruiting classes, with the 2021 class ranking No. 12. Over the last three seasons, USC has had four players selected in the NBA Draft, tied for the fifth-most by any program in the country, with Onyeka Okongwu being selected sixth in the 2020 NBA Draft. Enfield has an 132-102 record in his first seven seasons as the USC head coach and is 173-130 in nine seasons as a head coach. The 2019-20 Trojans went 22-9, finished tied for 3rd in the Pac-12 and were getting better as the season was cancelled due to COVID-19. USC won three straight and five of its last seven to closeout the season. The Trojans led Pac-12 teams in defensive field goal percentage and points per game allowed in Conference play.

The 2018-19 Trojans were bitten by the injury bug beginning late in the summer, practicing the majority of the preseason with seven or eight scholarship players. Ultimately USC players missed 54 games due to injury and finished with a 16-17 record after falling to regular season champion Washington 78-75 in the quarterfinals of the Pac-12 Tournament. The Trojans provided many highlights including back-to-back-to-back home wins over UCLA (80-67), Arizona (80-57) and Arizona State (69-67). Bennie Boatwright was third among Pac-12 players with an 18.2 scoring average and Nick Rakocevic flirted with a double-double average with 14.7 points and 9.3 points per game. Boatwright was named first team All-Pac-12 and Rakocevic was named honorable mention. USC led the Pac-12 in three-point field goal percentage, assists and assist to turnover ratio.

Enfield guided the 2017-18 Trojans to a 24-12 record and to a second place finish in the Pac-12, its highest outright conference finish since 1992. USC’s 12 Pac-12 wins were its most since also going 12-6 in 2002. The Trojans reached the Pac-12 Tournament finals for the first time since winning the title in 2009. USC fell 75-61 to regular season conference champion Arizona in the title game, after defeating Oregon (74-54) and Oregon State (61-48) in the first two rounds. Guards Jordan McLaughlin and Jonah Mathews were named to the All-Tournament team. McLaughlin and Chimezie Metu were named first-team All-Pac-12 and McLaughlin was named to the All-Defensive team and Metu was named honorable mention on that team. USC won the Diamond Head Classic in Hawai’i by defeating Akron, Middle Tennessee State and NCAA-Tournament bound New Mexico State. USC set school records with 296 three-pointers made, 1022 FG made and 569 assists. The Trojans also scored the second-most points by a USC team in history (2,798). The Trojans accomplished all of this and achieved a No. 10 ranking in the preseason, its highest since the 1974-75 season, despite 40 percent of its projected starting lineup missing much of the season.

USC went 26-10 in the 2016-17 season to set the school record for wins in a season, was in the top 25 rankings for five weeks with a high of No. 22 and won two NCAA Tournament games. The Trojans won their first 14 games which was tied for the fourth-longest winning streak in school history and was the best USC start since the 1971 season. The 13-0 mark in nonconference regular season action was just the sixth time in school history USC had gone undefeated in the nonconference slate. USC’s 47 combined wins during the 2016 and 2017 seasons were the most by the Trojans in a two-season stretch, breaking the mark of 46 total wins in consecutive seasons done in 2001-02 and 2007-08. USC defeated Providence in the First Four game for its first NCAA Tournament win since the 2009 season, then defeated No. 11 SMU before falling 82-78 to No. 12 Baylor, one win away from a Sweet 16 berth. USC won consecutive NCAA Tournament games for the first time since also winning two straight in the 2007 Tourney. USC continued to play its up-tempo style and set the school record for assists (550), three-pointers made (283) and shots blocked (190), while recording its most steals as a team (252) since the 2003 season. USC also averaged 4.25 dunks per game (153 total) and had seven players average at least 7.0 points. Chimezie Metu was named the Pac-12’s Most Improved Player and to the Pac-12 All-Conference second team, while Jordan McLaughlin was named honorable mention All-Pac-12 and De’Anthony Melton was named honorable mention on the Pac-12 All-Defensive Team.

After bringing in his recruits and establishing his system during the first two seasons, his Trojans took a big leap forward in the 2015-16 season. USC went 21-13 and advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2011. The Trojans had an 8.0 game improvement from the 2014-15 season which was tops among the Power 5 conference teams. USC played an exciting brand of basketball, averaging over 80 points per game and ranking among the nation’s top 20 in offensive output. They matched a school record with four 100-point games in a season, after not having broken the century mark since 2002. The Trojans set the then school record with 266 three-pointers made and were in the top 25 in the country in three-point percentage. The high-flying athletic style was also in effect in the 2015-16 season as the Trojans averaged over 3.5 dunks per game and set the then USC season record with 182 blocks, ranking in the top 15 in the country in this category. USC’s two freshmen in 2015-16 - Bennie Boatwright and Metu - made an immediate impact as Boatwright averaged 11.5 points and 5.2 rebounds per game, while Metu posted the second-most blocks ever by a Trojan freshman.

Enfield and staff brought in the No. 12-ranked freshman class in 2014-15 and they became key members of the team. McLaughlin was named to the 2015 Pac-12 All-Freshman team and went on to become one of three Pac-12 players all-time to record 700 or more assists and 1,600 or more career points scored. Elijah Stewart would leave USC as the school’s career record-holder for three-point baskets made. USC went 12-20 during the 2014-15 campaign, including a Pac-12 Tournament first-round upset win over Arizona State.

USC went 11-21 in his first season, but Enfield developed freshmen Nikola Jovanovic and Julian Jacobs into impact Pac-12 players, In 2016, Jacobs would lead the Pac-12 in assists and was named to the All-Conference team.

Enfield captivated the nation in 2013 as the head coach at Florida Gulf Coast University as he guided the first No. 15 seed into the NCAA Sweet Sixteen with impressive wins over No. 2 seed Georgetown and No. 7 seed San Diego State and introduced the world to “Dunk City,” the nickname for FGCU’s high-flying and high-speed offense which often ended with thunderous dunks.

Over Enfield’s two-year run at FGCU, the Eagles won 41 games, advanced to the A-Sun Championship game both seasons and became the first No. 15 seed in NCAA Tournament history to make the Sweet Sixteen. His two seasons were the program’s first as Division I postseason eligible.

Enfield was 41-28 in his two seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13) at FGCU, with the 41 victories equaling the program’s combined total in the four years before he arrived. His squads played an up-tempo offense that featured spectacular dunks and alley-oops (they were nicknamed “Dunk City”) and a defense that thrived on takeaways, as they ranked 16th nationally in steals (8.9 per game). He produced the 2013 Atlantic Sun Player of the Year (Sherwood Brown) and Defensive Player of the Year (Bernard Thompson).

In his second year at Florida Gulf Coast, Enfield led the Eagles to a school-record 26 wins in 2013, including a victory over No. 5 Miami. The Eagles won the Atlantic Sun Tournament with a resounding 88-75 victory over Mercer. In just the school’s second season of NCAA Division I post-season eligibility, FGCU became the first team since Florida in 1987 to win the first two NCAA Tournament games it ever played. As the NCAA tourney’s No. 15 seed, the Eagles shocked second-seeded Georgetown and then seventh-seed San Diego State to advance to the Sweet Sixteen. In 2012 in his first year at FGCU, he led the team to the Atlantic Sun Tournament championship game.

Prior to going to FGCU, Enfield spent the previous five years (2006-07 through 2010-11) as an assistant coach at Florida State, helping the Seminoles to three consecutive NCAA Tournaments (2009-11), including the Sweet 16 in 2011.

Enfield helped the Seminoles’ staff sign three straight Top 25 classes, with the 2008 class ranked in the Top 10. The 2011 FSU roster featured 11 top 100 recruits and a pair of McDonald’s All-Americans. In 2009, Basketball Times named him the nation’s “Most Visible Assistant Coach” for the summer recruiting period, while ESPN The Magazine selected him as one of “Five Super Assistant Coaches in College Basketball” during the 2009 campaign.

Enfield began his coaching career in the NBA, serving as the shooting coach for the Milwaukee Bucks for two seasons (1994-95 and 1995-96). He then was an assistant coach with the Boston Celtics for two seasons (1998-99 and 1999-2000). Through his company All Net Basketball, he was a player development consultant for NBA teams and players, focusing on improving shooting technique and offensive skills.

Enfield played four seasons (1987-88 through 1990-91) at Johns Hopkins, scoring a program-record 2,025 career points. He set the NCAA all-divisions career free throw percentage record (92.5, hitting 431-of-466 shots). He was a Division III All-American third teamer in 1991 and was inducted into the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2001.

He was a GTE Academic All-America first team selection as a senior and second teamer as a junior. He was the first basketball player at Johns Hopkins to earn an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and was named the NABC Scholar-Athlete of the Year in 1991. He earned his economics degree from Johns Hopkins in 1991. He has a master’s in business administration from the University of Maryland.

He prepped at Shippensburg (Penn.) High, where he was the class valedictorian.

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    Booking fees for Andy Enfield, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies between live and virtual events. Other factors that can affect speaker fees include the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. The live and virtual event speaking fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Andy Enfield, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • WHO IS THE AGENT FOR Andy Enfield?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Andy Enfield for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Andy Enfield for your next private or corporate function.
  • WHAT IS A FULL-SERVICE TALENT BOOKING AGENCY?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Andy Enfield or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Andy Enfield or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.
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Andy Enfield

Head Basketball Coach of the USC Trojans

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Andy Enfield Biography

Andy Enfield, 51, a proven winner as a player, assistant coach and head coach, was named the USC men’s basketball head coach on April 1, 2013 and has quickly brought success to the Trojans’ basketball program. Results came immediately with the Trojans setting the school single-season win record and the most wins in program history over a two-year, three-year, four-year and five-year period. USC has won 109 games over the last five seasons which is the third-most wins in the Pac-12 and the 21st-most wins in the nation among power conferences during that time. USC has had the second-best overall record in the Pac-12 two of the last three seasons (24-12 in 2018 & 22-9 in 2020).

Enfield guided the Trojans into the postseason in three consecutive seasons (2016-18), the first time for USC since 2007-09, all while his athletes have set the program’s top team GPAs for the Spring, Fall and Summer sessions. Enfield has brought in seven consecutive Top 30 recruiting classes, with the 2021 class ranking No. 12. Over the last three seasons, USC has had four players selected in the NBA Draft, tied for the fifth-most by any program in the country, with Onyeka Okongwu being selected sixth in the 2020 NBA Draft. Enfield has an 132-102 record in his first seven seasons as the USC head coach and is 173-130 in nine seasons as a head coach. The 2019-20 Trojans went 22-9, finished tied for 3rd in the Pac-12 and were getting better as the season was cancelled due to COVID-19. USC won three straight and five of its last seven to closeout the season. The Trojans led Pac-12 teams in defensive field goal percentage and points per game allowed in Conference play.

The 2018-19 Trojans were bitten by the injury bug beginning late in the summer, practicing the majority of the preseason with seven or eight scholarship players. Ultimately USC players missed 54 games due to injury and finished with a 16-17 record after falling to regular season champion Washington 78-75 in the quarterfinals of the Pac-12 Tournament. The Trojans provided many highlights including back-to-back-to-back home wins over UCLA (80-67), Arizona (80-57) and Arizona State (69-67). Bennie Boatwright was third among Pac-12 players with an 18.2 scoring average and Nick Rakocevic flirted with a double-double average with 14.7 points and 9.3 points per game. Boatwright was named first team All-Pac-12 and Rakocevic was named honorable mention. USC led the Pac-12 in three-point field goal percentage, assists and assist to turnover ratio.

Enfield guided the 2017-18 Trojans to a 24-12 record and to a second place finish in the Pac-12, its highest outright conference finish since 1992. USC’s 12 Pac-12 wins were its most since also going 12-6 in 2002. The Trojans reached the Pac-12 Tournament finals for the first time since winning the title in 2009. USC fell 75-61 to regular season conference champion Arizona in the title game, after defeating Oregon (74-54) and Oregon State (61-48) in the first two rounds. Guards Jordan McLaughlin and Jonah Mathews were named to the All-Tournament team. McLaughlin and Chimezie Metu were named first-team All-Pac-12 and McLaughlin was named to the All-Defensive team and Metu was named honorable mention on that team. USC won the Diamond Head Classic in Hawai’i by defeating Akron, Middle Tennessee State and NCAA-Tournament bound New Mexico State. USC set school records with 296 three-pointers made, 1022 FG made and 569 assists. The Trojans also scored the second-most points by a USC team in history (2,798). The Trojans accomplished all of this and achieved a No. 10 ranking in the preseason, its highest since the 1974-75 season, despite 40 percent of its projected starting lineup missing much of the season.

USC went 26-10 in the 2016-17 season to set the school record for wins in a season, was in the top 25 rankings for five weeks with a high of No. 22 and won two NCAA Tournament games. The Trojans won their first 14 games which was tied for the fourth-longest winning streak in school history and was the best USC start since the 1971 season. The 13-0 mark in nonconference regular season action was just the sixth time in school history USC had gone undefeated in the nonconference slate. USC’s 47 combined wins during the 2016 and 2017 seasons were the most by the Trojans in a two-season stretch, breaking the mark of 46 total wins in consecutive seasons done in 2001-02 and 2007-08. USC defeated Providence in the First Four game for its first NCAA Tournament win since the 2009 season, then defeated No. 11 SMU before falling 82-78 to No. 12 Baylor, one win away from a Sweet 16 berth. USC won consecutive NCAA Tournament games for the first time since also winning two straight in the 2007 Tourney. USC continued to play its up-tempo style and set the school record for assists (550), three-pointers made (283) and shots blocked (190), while recording its most steals as a team (252) since the 2003 season. USC also averaged 4.25 dunks per game (153 total) and had seven players average at least 7.0 points. Chimezie Metu was named the Pac-12’s Most Improved Player and to the Pac-12 All-Conference second team, while Jordan McLaughlin was named honorable mention All-Pac-12 and De’Anthony Melton was named honorable mention on the Pac-12 All-Defensive Team.

After bringing in his recruits and establishing his system during the first two seasons, his Trojans took a big leap forward in the 2015-16 season. USC went 21-13 and advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2011. The Trojans had an 8.0 game improvement from the 2014-15 season which was tops among the Power 5 conference teams. USC played an exciting brand of basketball, averaging over 80 points per game and ranking among the nation’s top 20 in offensive output. They matched a school record with four 100-point games in a season, after not having broken the century mark since 2002. The Trojans set the then school record with 266 three-pointers made and were in the top 25 in the country in three-point percentage. The high-flying athletic style was also in effect in the 2015-16 season as the Trojans averaged over 3.5 dunks per game and set the then USC season record with 182 blocks, ranking in the top 15 in the country in this category. USC’s two freshmen in 2015-16 - Bennie Boatwright and Metu - made an immediate impact as Boatwright averaged 11.5 points and 5.2 rebounds per game, while Metu posted the second-most blocks ever by a Trojan freshman.

Enfield and staff brought in the No. 12-ranked freshman class in 2014-15 and they became key members of the team. McLaughlin was named to the 2015 Pac-12 All-Freshman team and went on to become one of three Pac-12 players all-time to record 700 or more assists and 1,600 or more career points scored. Elijah Stewart would leave USC as the school’s career record-holder for three-point baskets made. USC went 12-20 during the 2014-15 campaign, including a Pac-12 Tournament first-round upset win over Arizona State.

USC went 11-21 in his first season, but Enfield developed freshmen Nikola Jovanovic and Julian Jacobs into impact Pac-12 players, In 2016, Jacobs would lead the Pac-12 in assists and was named to the All-Conference team.

Enfield captivated the nation in 2013 as the head coach at Florida Gulf Coast University as he guided the first No. 15 seed into the NCAA Sweet Sixteen with impressive wins over No. 2 seed Georgetown and No. 7 seed San Diego State and introduced the world to “Dunk City,” the nickname for FGCU’s high-flying and high-speed offense which often ended with thunderous dunks.

Over Enfield’s two-year run at FGCU, the Eagles won 41 games, advanced to the A-Sun Championship game both seasons and became the first No. 15 seed in NCAA Tournament history to make the Sweet Sixteen. His two seasons were the program’s first as Division I postseason eligible.

Enfield was 41-28 in his two seasons (2011-12 and 2012-13) at FGCU, with the 41 victories equaling the program’s combined total in the four years before he arrived. His squads played an up-tempo offense that featured spectacular dunks and alley-oops (they were nicknamed “Dunk City”) and a defense that thrived on takeaways, as they ranked 16th nationally in steals (8.9 per game). He produced the 2013 Atlantic Sun Player of the Year (Sherwood Brown) and Defensive Player of the Year (Bernard Thompson).

In his second year at Florida Gulf Coast, Enfield led the Eagles to a school-record 26 wins in 2013, including a victory over No. 5 Miami. The Eagles won the Atlantic Sun Tournament with a resounding 88-75 victory over Mercer. In just the school’s second season of NCAA Division I post-season eligibility, FGCU became the first team since Florida in 1987 to win the first two NCAA Tournament games it ever played. As the NCAA tourney’s No. 15 seed, the Eagles shocked second-seeded Georgetown and then seventh-seed San Diego State to advance to the Sweet Sixteen. In 2012 in his first year at FGCU, he led the team to the Atlantic Sun Tournament championship game.

Prior to going to FGCU, Enfield spent the previous five years (2006-07 through 2010-11) as an assistant coach at Florida State, helping the Seminoles to three consecutive NCAA Tournaments (2009-11), including the Sweet 16 in 2011.

Enfield helped the Seminoles’ staff sign three straight Top 25 classes, with the 2008 class ranked in the Top 10. The 2011 FSU roster featured 11 top 100 recruits and a pair of McDonald’s All-Americans. In 2009, Basketball Times named him the nation’s “Most Visible Assistant Coach” for the summer recruiting period, while ESPN The Magazine selected him as one of “Five Super Assistant Coaches in College Basketball” during the 2009 campaign.

Enfield began his coaching career in the NBA, serving as the shooting coach for the Milwaukee Bucks for two seasons (1994-95 and 1995-96). He then was an assistant coach with the Boston Celtics for two seasons (1998-99 and 1999-2000). Through his company All Net Basketball, he was a player development consultant for NBA teams and players, focusing on improving shooting technique and offensive skills.

Enfield played four seasons (1987-88 through 1990-91) at Johns Hopkins, scoring a program-record 2,025 career points. He set the NCAA all-divisions career free throw percentage record (92.5, hitting 431-of-466 shots). He was a Division III All-American third teamer in 1991 and was inducted into the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2001.

He was a GTE Academic All-America first team selection as a senior and second teamer as a junior. He was the first basketball player at Johns Hopkins to earn an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and was named the NABC Scholar-Athlete of the Year in 1991. He earned his economics degree from Johns Hopkins in 1991. He has a master’s in business administration from the University of Maryland.

He prepped at Shippensburg (Penn.) High, where he was the class valedictorian.

Andy Enfield Videos

  • USC Men's Basketball - Andy Enfield Introductory Press Conference ...

FAQs on booking Andy Enfield

  • How to book Andy Enfield?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like Andy Enfield for both live and virtual events for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment. Fill out a booking request form for Andy Enfield, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for Andy Enfield or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • How much does it cost to book Andy Enfield?

    Booking fees for Andy Enfield, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies between live and virtual events. Other factors that can affect speaker fees include the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. The live and virtual event speaking fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Andy Enfield, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • Who is the agent for Andy Enfield?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Andy Enfield for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Andy Enfield for your next private or corporate function.
  • What is a full-service talent booking agency?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Andy Enfield or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Andy Enfield or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.

Andy Enfield is a keynote speaker and industry expert who speaks on a wide range of topics . The estimated speaking fee range to book Andy Enfield for your event is available upon request. Andy Enfield generally travels from Fort Myers, FL, USA and can be booked for (private) corporate events, personal appearances, keynote speeches, or other performances. Similar motivational celebrity speakers are Steve Alford, Bob Chapman, Rob Paulson, David Skok and Jeff Boss. Contact All American Speakers for ratings, reviews, videos and information on scheduling Andy Enfield for an upcoming live or virtual event.

Andy Enfield Speaker Videos

  • USC Men's Basketball - Andy Enfield Introductory Press Conference ...

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Speakers Similar to Andy Enfield

This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

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