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Adam Gopnik

5 out of 5

Staff Writer for The New Yorker & Author of "The Table Comes First"

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 Adam Gopnik Biography

This award-winning journalist speaks with singular wit, eloquence and insight on modern life and culture. He has a rich trove of delightful stories and revealing observations about people and places and everyday life. Adam writes long essays on big think- ers for "The New Yorker." He has a genius for bringing these people and their ideas to life in and for communicating the emotions behind these ideas, the feelings these ideas evoke in us, and their relevance to modern life.

Adam has been writing for "The New Yorker" since 1986, and his work for the magazine has won both the National Magazine Award for Essay and the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He has broadcasted regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and wrote the article on American culture for the last two editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica. In 2013, the French government named Adam a Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters.

In his book, "The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food," Adam goes on a quest to find the meaning of food and discovers that what matters the most isn’t what goes on the table, it’s what gathers around it: family, friends, lovers and conversation. His previous book is "Angels & Ages: A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life." In it, Adam displays his gift for using historical biography to explore the way we live today. He looks at the birth of the modern era through the lives of Lincoln and Darwin, two extraordinary people born within hours of each other 200 years ago. Among his many other books is "Through the Children’s Gate," a meditation on hope, as his family, his city and his country live through and past the events of 9/ll. In "Paris to the Moon," Adam gave us the romance that is Paris through the everyday adventures of his own American family living there from 1995 to 2000.

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Videos
Books
The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food

The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food

Winter: Five Windows on the Season

Winter: Five Windows on the Season

The Steps Across the Water

The Steps Across the Water

Angels and Ages: Lincoln, Darwin, and the Birth of the Modern Age

Angels and Ages: Lincoln, Darwin, and the Birth of the Modern Age

Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York

Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York

The King in the Window

The King in the Window

Speaking Topics
  • The Humanities as the Basis for Scientific Inquiry

    In the past few years, no question has been more loudly agitated than the question of why we should study the humanities, the liberal arts, at all. And one of the ways that the humanities have been dismissed is by people insisting that the sciences — engineering in a practical level, theoretical physics and evolutionary biology at a higher one — have dislodged them completely from our civilization as sources of wisdom. The humanities may be a lovely ornamental frosting — or a touching vestigial remnant — but that’s about it. But if you actually look at the history of the way that humanities and sciences intertwine — and if you try to study the psychology of the way new ideas arrive, become potent and spread, the way creativity really happens — you see that the reality is different. From the beginning of the scientific revolution, the intertwining of the humanities and sciences has been fundamental. And if you study what it is we really know about the way new ideas arrive you find out that it’s through the entrance of very powerful new aesthetic visions of possible worlds — and psychological ideas about human possibility, too — that innovation takes place. You could begin with two men born in the same year, exactly four hundred and fifty years ago —Shakespeare and Galileo: the greatest of all Western writers, the originator of Western science. You’d expect that their lives would flow at completely opposite angles, or in completely opposite direction– but in truth Galileo’s father, far from being an early scientist, was a lute player — and not just a lute player but a lute theorist, a master of the new art and craft of tuning. And there’s a very real sense in which the Florentine Galileo, who studied the liberal arts long before he mastered the budding natural sciences, drew on the great Italian Renaissance artistic accomplishment of progressive achievement as a model for learning. The way that the conquest of the visual world took place in Italian Renaissance painting — so that the art of Masaccio in 1420, wonderful as it is, looks stiff and archaic in comparison with that of Michelangelo only eighty years later — preceded the conquest of the natural world, and Galileo fed on the optimism, the sense of possible progress that those accomplishments in the liberal arts had offered. In the same way, Shakespeare’s expansion of the poetic resources of literature drew on what some people have called a newly ‘empathetic ‘expansion of his curiosity. Along with great writers like Montaigne in France and Cervantes in Spain, Shakespeare understood that there was a complicated, conflicted, ambivalent and often contradictory self in all of us that could be dramatized rather than apologized for. We weren’t simply stuck with the neat labels of medieval pageants: Good, Bad, Mr. Morality, and Mr. Immorality — in order to understand ourselves. In that way, he was applying as a kind of intuitive psychologist the same ideas of seeing for yourself and imagining new possibilities that was pregnant in the era’s science. One might say that Galileo’s genius for empirical curiosity is matched by Shakespeare’s genius for empathetic curiosity. Both engage not in a dutiful catalogue of observations nor a pure act of poetic imagination: both men were free to imagine, and thought that imagination was strongest when it was held to the discipline of nature, of the way things really are. They imagined nature in new ways, and then held a mirror to it, to see if it matched. They arrive in different places: one of the truths about empathetic curiosity is that while the motions of the planets are, relatively speaking, simple, the motions of our minds and hearts are too dense, too sticky with human ambiguity, to be neatly explained. The motions of the planets, on the other hand, can be explained and predicted. But the central activity of making up powerful poetic models of the world, and then testing them against our experience, are remarkably alike between the birth of science and the birth of the modern idea of man. And it’s in that double movement, the freedom to imagine, the readiness to test — that the originality of Shakespeare and Galileo rises and provides a model of how the humanities can reimagine our lives but our worlds. It’s the same likeness I exemplified in my book about Darwin and Lincoln — so that the great founder of evolutionary biology drew on the power of lucid writing as much as his power of exemplary seeing, on the force of the eloquence of explanation, just as his spiritual soul mate across the water showed that it was possible for liberalism to be a fighting but constantly self-defining creed. This intertwining and underlying likeness — and mutual dependence — between liberal civilization and scientific advance is a theme that can be traced from its first appearance into our own day. (Including Einstein’s new vision of time and its relation to that of the Cubists, and right up to Steve Jobs’ aesthetic imperative.)

  • The Table Comes First

    Locating our table ancestry in France, Adam Gopnik traces our rapid evolution from commendable awareness to manic compulsion and how, on the way, we lost sight of a timeless truth: what goes on around the table—families, friends, lovers coming together, or breaking apart; conversation across the simplest or grandest board—is always more important than what we put on the table.

  • Angels and Ages

    Lincoln and Darwin: their genius – their legacies – their humanity. Born on the same day 200 years ago, these two men and their words reshaped modern consciousness. On a memorable day in human history, February 12, 1809, two babies were born an ocean apart: Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Together they became midwives to the spirit of a new world, a new kind of hope and faith. Searching for the men behind the icons of emancipation and evolution, Adam Gopnik reveals them as both ordinary family men with ambitions, faults and loves and as great thinkers who helped shape the modern world—a world increasingly governed by reason, argument and observation, by the verdicts of time and history. As writers, they invented a new language to express that understanding, the liberal voice we now use both at home and in public. This presentation is a meditation as only Adam Gopnik can deliver it on how we got where we are and how we became who we are as children of robust democracy and science.

  • Through the Children’s Gate

    Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux gave names to all the entrances of their most famous work of genius, Central Park. The Children’s Gate is the entrance on the east side at Seventy-sixth Street and Fifth Avenue; and it’s the metaphor for why, after five years in Paris, his family came back to New York: so their children could "grow up in New York, to be natives here, as we could never be, to come in through the Children’s Gate, not the Stranger’s Gate" (which is high on the West Side). From Bluei, a goldfish fated to meet a Hitchcockian end, to Charlie Ravioli, an imaginary playmate who, being a New Yorker, is too busy to play, Adam’s book—and his presentation—are full of characters with extraordinary resonance for parents and children, for city-dwelling lovers of place, and any audience eager to pass through the Children’s Gate with him.

FAQs
  • HOW TO BOOK Adam Gopnik?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like Adam Gopnik for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for Adam Gopnik, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for Adam Gopnik or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO BOOK Adam Gopnik?

    Booking fees for Adam Gopnik, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Adam Gopnik, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • WHO IS THE AGENT FOR Adam Gopnik?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Adam Gopnik for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Adam Gopnik for your next private or corporate function.
  • WHAT IS A FULL-SERVICE TALENT BOOKING AGENCY?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Adam Gopnik or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Adam Gopnik or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.
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This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

Adam Gopnik

5 out of 5

Staff Writer for The New Yorker & Author of "The Table Comes First"

Travels From:
New York, NY, USA
Speaking Fee:

Adam Gopnik Biography

This award-winning journalist speaks with singular wit, eloquence and insight on modern life and culture. He has a rich trove of delightful stories and revealing observations about people and places and everyday life. Adam writes long essays on big think- ers for "The New Yorker." He has a genius for bringing these people and their ideas to life in and for communicating the emotions behind these ideas, the feelings these ideas evoke in us, and their relevance to modern life.

Adam has been writing for "The New Yorker" since 1986, and his work for the magazine has won both the National Magazine Award for Essay and the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He has broadcasted regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and wrote the article on American culture for the last two editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica. In 2013, the French government named Adam a Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters.

In his book, "The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food," Adam goes on a quest to find the meaning of food and discovers that what matters the most isn’t what goes on the table, it’s what gathers around it: family, friends, lovers and conversation. His previous book is "Angels & Ages: A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life." In it, Adam displays his gift for using historical biography to explore the way we live today. He looks at the birth of the modern era through the lives of Lincoln and Darwin, two extraordinary people born within hours of each other 200 years ago. Among his many other books is "Through the Children’s Gate," a meditation on hope, as his family, his city and his country live through and past the events of 9/ll. In "Paris to the Moon," Adam gave us the romance that is Paris through the everyday adventures of his own American family living there from 1995 to 2000.

Adam Gopnik Videos

  • To master, lose your routines
  • Adam Gopnik: Shakespeare and Feasting | The Forum | Stratford ...
  • An Evening at the Moth: Adam Gopnik - YouTube

Adam Gopnik Books

Adam Gopnik Speaking Topics

  • The Humanities as the Basis for Scientific Inquiry

    In the past few years, no question has been more loudly agitated than the question of why we should study the humanities, the liberal arts, at all. And one of the ways that the humanities have been dismissed is by people insisting that the sciences — engineering in a practical level, theoretical physics and evolutionary biology at a higher one — have dislodged them completely from our civilization as sources of wisdom. The humanities may be a lovely ornamental frosting — or a touching vestigial remnant — but that’s about it. But if you actually look at the history of the way that humanities and sciences intertwine — and if you try to study the psychology of the way new ideas arrive, become potent and spread, the way creativity really happens — you see that the reality is different. From the beginning of the scientific revolution, the intertwining of the humanities and sciences has been fundamental. And if you study what it is we really know about the way new ideas arrive you find out that it’s through the entrance of very powerful new aesthetic visions of possible worlds — and psychological ideas about human possibility, too — that innovation takes place. You could begin with two men born in the same year, exactly four hundred and fifty years ago —Shakespeare and Galileo: the greatest of all Western writers, the originator of Western science. You’d expect that their lives would flow at completely opposite angles, or in completely opposite direction– but in truth Galileo’s father, far from being an early scientist, was a lute player — and not just a lute player but a lute theorist, a master of the new art and craft of tuning. And there’s a very real sense in which the Florentine Galileo, who studied the liberal arts long before he mastered the budding natural sciences, drew on the great Italian Renaissance artistic accomplishment of progressive achievement as a model for learning. The way that the conquest of the visual world took place in Italian Renaissance painting — so that the art of Masaccio in 1420, wonderful as it is, looks stiff and archaic in comparison with that of Michelangelo only eighty years later — preceded the conquest of the natural world, and Galileo fed on the optimism, the sense of possible progress that those accomplishments in the liberal arts had offered. In the same way, Shakespeare’s expansion of the poetic resources of literature drew on what some people have called a newly ‘empathetic ‘expansion of his curiosity. Along with great writers like Montaigne in France and Cervantes in Spain, Shakespeare understood that there was a complicated, conflicted, ambivalent and often contradictory self in all of us that could be dramatized rather than apologized for. We weren’t simply stuck with the neat labels of medieval pageants: Good, Bad, Mr. Morality, and Mr. Immorality — in order to understand ourselves. In that way, he was applying as a kind of intuitive psychologist the same ideas of seeing for yourself and imagining new possibilities that was pregnant in the era’s science. One might say that Galileo’s genius for empirical curiosity is matched by Shakespeare’s genius for empathetic curiosity. Both engage not in a dutiful catalogue of observations nor a pure act of poetic imagination: both men were free to imagine, and thought that imagination was strongest when it was held to the discipline of nature, of the way things really are. They imagined nature in new ways, and then held a mirror to it, to see if it matched. They arrive in different places: one of the truths about empathetic curiosity is that while the motions of the planets are, relatively speaking, simple, the motions of our minds and hearts are too dense, too sticky with human ambiguity, to be neatly explained. The motions of the planets, on the other hand, can be explained and predicted. But the central activity of making up powerful poetic models of the world, and then testing them against our experience, are remarkably alike between the birth of science and the birth of the modern idea of man. And it’s in that double movement, the freedom to imagine, the readiness to test — that the originality of Shakespeare and Galileo rises and provides a model of how the humanities can reimagine our lives but our worlds. It’s the same likeness I exemplified in my book about Darwin and Lincoln — so that the great founder of evolutionary biology drew on the power of lucid writing as much as his power of exemplary seeing, on the force of the eloquence of explanation, just as his spiritual soul mate across the water showed that it was possible for liberalism to be a fighting but constantly self-defining creed. This intertwining and underlying likeness — and mutual dependence — between liberal civilization and scientific advance is a theme that can be traced from its first appearance into our own day. (Including Einstein’s new vision of time and its relation to that of the Cubists, and right up to Steve Jobs’ aesthetic imperative.)

  • The Table Comes First

    Locating our table ancestry in France, Adam Gopnik traces our rapid evolution from commendable awareness to manic compulsion and how, on the way, we lost sight of a timeless truth: what goes on around the table—families, friends, lovers coming together, or breaking apart; conversation across the simplest or grandest board—is always more important than what we put on the table.

  • Angels and Ages

    Lincoln and Darwin: their genius – their legacies – their humanity. Born on the same day 200 years ago, these two men and their words reshaped modern consciousness. On a memorable day in human history, February 12, 1809, two babies were born an ocean apart: Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Together they became midwives to the spirit of a new world, a new kind of hope and faith. Searching for the men behind the icons of emancipation and evolution, Adam Gopnik reveals them as both ordinary family men with ambitions, faults and loves and as great thinkers who helped shape the modern world—a world increasingly governed by reason, argument and observation, by the verdicts of time and history. As writers, they invented a new language to express that understanding, the liberal voice we now use both at home and in public. This presentation is a meditation as only Adam Gopnik can deliver it on how we got where we are and how we became who we are as children of robust democracy and science.

  • Through the Children’s Gate

    Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux gave names to all the entrances of their most famous work of genius, Central Park. The Children’s Gate is the entrance on the east side at Seventy-sixth Street and Fifth Avenue; and it’s the metaphor for why, after five years in Paris, his family came back to New York: so their children could "grow up in New York, to be natives here, as we could never be, to come in through the Children’s Gate, not the Stranger’s Gate" (which is high on the West Side). From Bluei, a goldfish fated to meet a Hitchcockian end, to Charlie Ravioli, an imaginary playmate who, being a New Yorker, is too busy to play, Adam’s book—and his presentation—are full of characters with extraordinary resonance for parents and children, for city-dwelling lovers of place, and any audience eager to pass through the Children’s Gate with him.

FAQs on booking Adam Gopnik

  • How to book Adam Gopnik?

    Our booking agents have successfully helped clients around the world secure talent like Adam Gopnik for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements, or corporate entertainment for over 15 years. The team at All American Entertainment represents and listens to the needs of organizations and corporations seeking to hire keynote speakers, celebrities or entertainers. Fill out a booking request form for Adam Gopnik, or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to discuss your upcoming event. One of our experienced agents will be happy to help you get pricing information and check availability for Adam Gopnik or any other celebrity of your choice.
  • How much does it cost to book Adam Gopnik?

    Booking fees for Adam Gopnik, or any other speakers and celebrities, are determined based on a number of factors and may change without notice. Pricing often varies according to the circumstances, including the talent's schedule, market conditions, length of presentation, and the location of the event. Speaker fees listed on this website are intended to serve as a guideline only. In some cases, the actual quote may be above or below the stated range. For the most current fee to hire Adam Gopnik, please fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536 to speak with an experienced booking agent.
  • Who is the agent for Adam Gopnik?

    All American Entertainment has successfully secured celebrity talent like Adam Gopnik for clients worldwide for more than 15 years. As a full-service talent booking agency, we have access to virtually any speaker or celebrity in the world. Our agents are happy and able to submit an offer to the speaker or celebrity of your choice, letting you benefit from our reputation and long-standing relationships in the industry. Fill out the booking request form or call our office at 1.800.698.2536, and one of our agents will assist you to book Adam Gopnik for your next private or corporate function.
  • What is a full-service talent booking agency?

    All American Speakers is a "buyers agent" and exclusively represents talent buyers, meeting planners and event professionals, who are looking to secure celebrities and speakers for personal appearances, speaking engagements, corporate entertainment, public relations campaigns, commercials, or endorsements. We do not exclusively represent Adam Gopnik or claim ourselves as the exclusive booking agency, business manager, publicist, speakers bureau or management for Adam Gopnik or any other speaker or celebrity on this website. For more information on how we work and what makes us unique, please read the AAE Advantage.

Adam Gopnik is a keynote speaker and industry expert who speaks on a wide range of topics . The estimated speaking fee range to book Adam Gopnik for your event is $10,000 - $20,000. Adam Gopnik generally travels from New York, NY, USA and can be booked for (private) corporate events, personal appearances, keynote speeches, or other performances. Similar motivational celebrity speakers are David Remnick, Rosanne Cash, Jonathan Safran Foer, Adam Carolla and Alison Stewart. Contact All American Speakers for ratings, reviews, videos and information on scheduling Adam Gopnik for an upcoming event.

Adam Gopnik Speaker Videos

  • To master, lose your routines
    Adam Gopnik: Shakespeare and Feasting | The Forum | Stratford ...
  • An Evening at the Moth: Adam Gopnik - YouTube

Adam Gopnik Speaking Topics

  • The Humanities as the Basis for Scientific Inquiry

    In the past few years, no question has been more loudly agitated than the question of why we should study the humanities, the liberal arts, at all. And one of the ways that the humanities have been dismissed is by people insisting that the sciences — engineering in a practical level, theoretical physics and evolutionary biology at a higher one — have dislodged them completely from our civilization as sources of wisdom. The humanities may be a lovely ornamental frosting — or a touching vestigial remnant — but that’s about it. But if you actually look at the history of the way that humanities and sciences intertwine — and if you try to study the psychology of the way new ideas arrive, become potent and spread, the way creativity really happens — you see that the reality is different. From the beginning of the scientific revolution, the intertwining of the humanities and sciences has been fundamental. And if you study what it is we really know about the way new ideas arrive you find out that it’s through the entrance of very powerful new aesthetic visions of possible worlds — and psychological ideas about human possibility, too — that innovation takes place. You could begin with two men born in the same year, exactly four hundred and fifty years ago —Shakespeare and Galileo: the greatest of all Western writers, the originator of Western science. You’d expect that their lives would flow at completely opposite angles, or in completely opposite direction– but in truth Galileo’s father, far from being an early scientist, was a lute player — and not just a lute player but a lute theorist, a master of the new art and craft of tuning. And there’s a very real sense in which the Florentine Galileo, who studied the liberal arts long before he mastered the budding natural sciences, drew on the great Italian Renaissance artistic accomplishment of progressive achievement as a model for learning. The way that the conquest of the visual world took place in Italian Renaissance painting — so that the art of Masaccio in 1420, wonderful as it is, looks stiff and archaic in comparison with that of Michelangelo only eighty years later — preceded the conquest of the natural world, and Galileo fed on the optimism, the sense of possible progress that those accomplishments in the liberal arts had offered. In the same way, Shakespeare’s expansion of the poetic resources of literature drew on what some people have called a newly ‘empathetic ‘expansion of his curiosity. Along with great writers like Montaigne in France and Cervantes in Spain, Shakespeare understood that there was a complicated, conflicted, ambivalent and often contradictory self in all of us that could be dramatized rather than apologized for. We weren’t simply stuck with the neat labels of medieval pageants: Good, Bad, Mr. Morality, and Mr. Immorality — in order to understand ourselves. In that way, he was applying as a kind of intuitive psychologist the same ideas of seeing for yourself and imagining new possibilities that was pregnant in the era’s science. One might say that Galileo’s genius for empirical curiosity is matched by Shakespeare’s genius for empathetic curiosity. Both engage not in a dutiful catalogue of observations nor a pure act of poetic imagination: both men were free to imagine, and thought that imagination was strongest when it was held to the discipline of nature, of the way things really are. They imagined nature in new ways, and then held a mirror to it, to see if it matched. They arrive in different places: one of the truths about empathetic curiosity is that while the motions of the planets are, relatively speaking, simple, the motions of our minds and hearts are too dense, too sticky with human ambiguity, to be neatly explained. The motions of the planets, on the other hand, can be explained and predicted. But the central activity of making up powerful poetic models of the world, and then testing them against our experience, are remarkably alike between the birth of science and the birth of the modern idea of man. And it’s in that double movement, the freedom to imagine, the readiness to test — that the originality of Shakespeare and Galileo rises and provides a model of how the humanities can reimagine our lives but our worlds. It’s the same likeness I exemplified in my book about Darwin and Lincoln — so that the great founder of evolutionary biology drew on the power of lucid writing as much as his power of exemplary seeing, on the force of the eloquence of explanation, just as his spiritual soul mate across the water showed that it was possible for liberalism to be a fighting but constantly self-defining creed. This intertwining and underlying likeness — and mutual dependence — between liberal civilization and scientific advance is a theme that can be traced from its first appearance into our own day. (Including Einstein’s new vision of time and its relation to that of the Cubists, and right up to Steve Jobs’ aesthetic imperative.)

  • The Table Comes First

    Locating our table ancestry in France, Adam Gopnik traces our rapid evolution from commendable awareness to manic compulsion and how, on the way, we lost sight of a timeless truth: what goes on around the table—families, friends, lovers coming together, or breaking apart; conversation across the simplest or grandest board—is always more important than what we put on the table.

  • Angels and Ages

    Lincoln and Darwin: their genius – their legacies – their humanity. Born on the same day 200 years ago, these two men and their words reshaped modern consciousness. On a memorable day in human history, February 12, 1809, two babies were born an ocean apart: Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Together they became midwives to the spirit of a new world, a new kind of hope and faith. Searching for the men behind the icons of emancipation and evolution, Adam Gopnik reveals them as both ordinary family men with ambitions, faults and loves and as great thinkers who helped shape the modern world—a world increasingly governed by reason, argument and observation, by the verdicts of time and history. As writers, they invented a new language to express that understanding, the liberal voice we now use both at home and in public. This presentation is a meditation as only Adam Gopnik can deliver it on how we got where we are and how we became who we are as children of robust democracy and science.

  • Through the Children’s Gate

    Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux gave names to all the entrances of their most famous work of genius, Central Park. The Children’s Gate is the entrance on the east side at Seventy-sixth Street and Fifth Avenue; and it’s the metaphor for why, after five years in Paris, his family came back to New York: so their children could "grow up in New York, to be natives here, as we could never be, to come in through the Children’s Gate, not the Stranger’s Gate" (which is high on the West Side). From Bluei, a goldfish fated to meet a Hitchcockian end, to Charlie Ravioli, an imaginary playmate who, being a New Yorker, is too busy to play, Adam’s book—and his presentation—are full of characters with extraordinary resonance for parents and children, for city-dwelling lovers of place, and any audience eager to pass through the Children’s Gate with him.

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Speakers Similar to Adam Gopnik

This website is a resource for event professionals and strives to provide the most comprehensive catalog of thought leaders and industry experts to consider for speaking engagements. A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent.

All American Entertainment (AAE) exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. AAE is a talent booking agency for paid events only. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information.

If you are the talent, and wish to request removal from this catalog or report an issue with your profile, please click here.

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